Posts Tagged: arxiv

  • stories

    Who dreamed up the primes=knots analogy?

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    One of the more surprising analogies around is that prime numbers can be viewed as knots in the 3-sphere $S^3$. The motivation behind it is that the (etale) fundamental group of $\pmb{spec}(\mathbb{Z}/(p))$ is equal to (the completion) of the fundamental group of a circle $S^1$ and that the embedding $\pmb{spec}(\mathbb{Z}/(p)) \subset \pmb{spec}(\mathbb{Z})$ embeds this circle… Read more »

  • absolute, stories

    Art and the absolute point (2)

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    Last time we did recall Manin’s comparisons between some approaches to geometry over the absolute point $\pmb{spec}(\mathbb{F}_1)$ and trends in the history of art. In the comments to that post, Javier Lopez-Pena wrote that he and Oliver Lorscheid briefly contemplated the idea of extending Manin’s artsy-dictionary to all approaches they did draw on their Map… Read more »

  • absolute, stories

    Art and the absolute point

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    In his paper Cyclotomy and analytic geometry over $\mathbb{F}_1$ Yuri I. Manin sketches and compares four approaches to the definition of a geometry over $\mathbb{F}_1$, the elusive field with one element. He writes : “Preparing a colloquium talk in Paris, I have succumbed to the temptation to associate them with some dominant trends in the… Read more »

  • web

    Lists 2010 : StackExchange sites

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    One of the trends of 2010 was the proliferation of StackExchange sites. I guess by now most of us visit MathOverflow along with the arXiv daily. But, there are plenty of other StackExchange sites around that may be of interest to the mathematics-community : Mathematics somewhat less high-brow than MathO. Physics still in the beta-phase… Read more »

  • stories

    math & manic-depression, a Faustian bargain

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    In the wake of a colleague’s suicide and the suicide of three students, Matilde Marcolli gave an interesting and courageous talk at Caltech in April : The dark heart of our brightness: bipolar disorder and scientific creativity. Although these slides give a pretty good picture of the talk, if you can please take the time… Read more »

  • web

    Return to LaTeX

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    To most mathematicians, a good LaTeX-frontend (such as TeXShop for Mac-users) is the crucial tool to get the work done. We use it to draft ideas, write papers and courses, or even to take notes during lectures. However, after six years of blogging, my own LaTeX-routine became rusty. I rarely open a new tex-document, and… Read more »

  • featured

    The odd knights of the round table

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    Here’s a tiny problem illustrating our limited knowledge of finite fields : “Imagine an infinite queue of Knights ${ K_1,K_2,K_3,\ldots } $, waiting to be seated at the unit-circular table. The master of ceremony (that is, you) must give Knights $K_a $ and $K_b $ a place at an odd root of unity, say $\omega_a… Read more »

  • featured

    Pollock your own noncommutative space

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    I really like Matilde Marcolli’s idea to use some of Jackson Pollock’s paintings as metaphors for noncommutative spaces. In her talk she used this painting and refered to it (as did I in my post) as : Jackson Pollock “Untitled N.3”. Before someone writes a post ‘The Pollock noncommutative space hoax’ (similar to my own… Read more »

  • groups

    E(8) from moonshine groups

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    Are the valencies of the 171 moonshine groups are compatible, that is, can one construct a (disconnected) graph on the 171 vertices such that in every vertex (determined by a moonshine group G) the vertex-valency coincides with the valency of the corresponding group? Duncan describes a subset of 9 moonshine groups for which the valencies… Read more »

  • groups

    the monster graph and McKay’s observation

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    While the verdict on a neolithic Scottish icosahedron is still open, let us recall Kostant’s group-theoretic construction of the icosahedron from its rotation-symmetry group $A_5 $. The alternating group $A_5 $ has two conjugacy classes of order 5 elements, both consisting of exactly 12 elements. Fix one of these conjugacy classes, say $C $ and… Read more »

  • groups, stories

    The Scottish solids hoax

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    A truly good math-story gets spread rather than scrutinized. And a good story it was : more than a millenium before Plato, the Neolithic Scottish Math Society classified the five regular solids : tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. And, we had solid evidence to support this claim : the NSMS mass-produced stone replicas of… Read more »

  • absolute, geometry, noncommutative

    Connes & Consani go categorical

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    Today, Alain Connes and Caterina Consani arXived their new paper Schemes over $ \mathbb{F}_1$ and zeta functions. It is a follow-up to their paper On the notion of geometry over $ \mathbb{F}_1$, which I’ve tried to explain in a series of posts starting here. As Javier noted already last week when they updated their first… Read more »

  • web

    math2.0-setup : final comments

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    Last time I promised to come back explaining how to set-up LaTeX-support, figuring I had to tell you about a few modifications I had to make in order to get Latexrender run on my mac… A few google searches made it plain how out of touch I am on these matters (details below). But first,… Read more »

  • web

    math2.0-setup : mysql and php+

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    Set up your own WPMU+BuddyPress site on a spare Mac in no time.

  • web

    yet another math2.0 proposal

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    Tim Gowers’ dream of massively collaborative mathematics got me thinking…

  • geometry, noncommutative

    noncommutative F_un geometry (2)

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    We use Kontsevich’s idea of thin varieties to define complexified varieties over F\_un.

  • absolute, geometry

    Connes-Consani for undergraduates (1)

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    A couple of weeks ago, Alain Connes and Katia Consani arXived their paper “On the notion of geometry over $\mathbb{F}_1 $”. Their subtle definition is phrased entirely in Grothendieck‘s scheme-theoretic language of representable functors and may be somewhat hard to get through if you only had a few years of mathematics. I’ll try to give… Read more »

  • web

    the future of… (3)

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    It is always great to hear about new and clever ways to use blogs and the internet to promote (and hopefully do) science better. So, I’m a keen consumer of the Flash-presentations of the talks at the Science in the 21st century conference. Bee of Backreaction is one of the organizers and has a post… Read more »

  • absolute, geometry, stories

    F_un with Manin

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    Amidst all LHC-noise, Yuri I. Manin arXived today an interesting paper Cyclotomy and analytic geometry over $\mathbb{F}_1 $. The paper gives a nice survey of the existent literature and focusses on the crucial role of roots of unity in the algebraic geometry over the non-existent field with one element $\mathbb{F}_1 $ (in French called ‘F-un’)…. Read more »

  • stories

    vaCation reading (3)

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    Over the last month a pile of books grew in our living room to impressive heights, intended to be packed for our usual 3+week vacation to the south of France. From the outset it was clear that ‘circumstances’ (see title for hint) forced us to slim it down to 2 weeks-max, this year. So, last… Read more »

  • web

    the future of this blog

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    Some weeks ago Peter Woit of Not Even Wrong and Bee of Backreaction had a video-chat on all sorts of things (see the links above to see the whole clip) including the nine minute passage below on ‘the future of (science) blogs’. click here to see the video The crucial point being that blogging takes… Read more »

  • featured

    what does the monster see?

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    The Monster is the largest of the 26 sporadic simple groups and has order 808 017 424 794 512 875 886 459 904 961 710 757 005 754 368 000 000 000 = 2^46 3^20 5^9 7^6 11^2 13^3 17 19 23 29 31 41 47 59 71. It is not so much the size… Read more »

  • games

    Surreal numbers & chess

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    Most chess programs are able to give a numerical evaluation of a position. For example, the position below is considered to be worth +8.7 with white to move, and, -0.7 with black to move (by a certain program). But, if one applies combinatorial game theory as in John Conway’s ONAG and the Berlekamp-Conway-Guy masterpiece Winning… Read more »

  • featured

    the King’s problem on MUBs

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    MUBs (for Mutually Unbiased Bases) are quite popular at the moment. Kea is running a mini-series Mutual Unbias as is Carl Brannen. Further, the Perimeter Institute has a good website for its seminars where they offer streaming video (I like their MacromediaFlash format giving video and slides/blackboard shots simultaneously, in distinct windows) including a talk… Read more »

  • stories

    quotes of the day

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    Some people are in urgent need of a vacation, myself included… From the paper Transseries for beginners by G.A. Edgar, arXived today : Well, brothers and sisters, I am here today to tell you: If you love these formulas, you need no longer hide in the shadows! The answer to all of these woes is… Read more »